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Using Filters in BigTime Foresight

In some cases, you’ll want to only view specific sets of data in BigTime Foresight rather than all of your data at once. Because of this, each view in Foresight includes filters that allow you to narrow down datasets to get more specific insights. This article will walk you through using filters in the People Calendar, Project Calendar, and your Demand screen.  

Quick Filtering in the People and Project Calendars

First, find the SEARCH BAR at the top of your screen to filter your data on the People or Project Calendars. In this search bar, you can either select certain data fields to filter for from a dropdown list or you can type the names of the fields you want to find them more quickly. 

You can save your Filter Set as a “favorite” and use it any time. Just click the STAR button on the right-top corner to save the filtered data set: 

Detailed Filtering in the Demand Calendar Tab

In the Demand Calendar, you can search by keywords and add a filter exactly like in other calendars. You can also use detailed filtering with specific parameters using a pop-up window:

 

 

Filter Rules, Explained

Example 1: Filtering People by  Their Assigned Project Managers 

When you open the details for a specific filter on the Demand, People or Project calendars, you’ll see the options to select specific types or “equations” that you want to apply to your filter. It is best to explain how these filter equations work with an example. Let’s say we are looking for staffers in the People Calendar based on the Project Managers assigned to them:

In this case, the meaning of the filter equations will be as follows:

is empty  searches for people who have no project manager assigned to them
is not empty searches for people who have been assigned any project manager
equals searches for people who have been assigned a project manager you listed below
not equals searches for people who have different project managers than those you listed below
includes any of finds people for whom one of the following people is their manager. Allows the user to search for all employees/projects who have any of the "phrases" selected for filtering; you can choose many
includes all of allows the user to search for all employees who have all the "phrases" selected for filtering; you can choose many
not include any of searches for people who do not have at least one of the project managers listed below assigned to them
not include all of searches for people who have not been assigned any of the project managers listed below
 

 

Example 2: Searching for People by Their Fulfillment Level

Searching for people using numerical parameters is different. In the second example below, we want to filter people by their fulfillment level:

 

 

The meaning of the filters will be as follows:

equals searches for people whose fulfillment will contain exactly the amount entered below
not equals searches for people whose fulfillment will not contain as much as entered below
less shows all people who have less fulfillment than the one entered below
less or equal shows all people whose fulfillment level is less than or equal to the number entered below
greater shows all people who have a greater fulfillment level than the one entered below
greater or equal shows all people who have a fulfillment level greater than or equal to the number entered below
between shows all people whose fulfillment level falls within the range indicated below

 

“Contains” Versus “Equals” and “Includes”: Explaining the Difference

Equals - something must be equal, e.g., Jane is not equal to Janett

Contains - allows the user to search for all employees/projects who have a specific "phrase" to filter; you can only choose one it isn’t only equal. To explain it with an example: Jane is included in Janet

Includes - applies to boards, i.e., Jane is contained in the board [Jane, Janet]

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